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MOTORCYCLE DEATHS ON THE RISE SINCE 2015

motorcycle-accident (1)

Motorcyclists are seemingly the most exposed on the road, and often times, the hardest for fellow drivers to spot.

According to an article on FairWarning, until recently, motorcyclist deaths were declining. Then, in 2015, motorcyclist deaths hit a record high in Oregon with 60 motorcyclists being killed on Oregon’s roadways. Since that time, they’ve been trending upward.

Many experts such as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, believe that with an anti-lock brake system (ABS) mandate, one-third of the motorcyclist deaths could be avoided, according to an article in The Oregonian.

According to the same articlethe National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been close to mandating ABS on motorcycles on many prior occasions, but officials decided on each occasion that there was insufficient proof the benefits outweighed the costs to the manufacturers.

In 2011, BMW became the first manufacturer to offer ABS as standard equipment on its entire line of motorcycles. No manufacturers followed in their footsteps.

The same article also stated that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration hopes that federally mandated safety initiatives such as ABS are put into place. They stated in a news release, “motorcycle fatalities and injuries have been on an upward trend for the past ten years and ABS and other safety technologies can help reduce these tragedies.”

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About the Author

Scott Edwards

Scott Edwards is a partner at Schauermann Thayer Jacobs Staples & Edwards law firm. Scott is licensed in both Oregon and Washington, and has been practicing law since 2008. Though Scott started his career working for insurance companies, he now focuses his practice on personal injury, auto accident, biking accident, and insurance cases. In his free time, Scott enjoys spending time pedaling around the streets of Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon on his bicycle.

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